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THE BEATLES / I'M ONLY SLEEPING / U.S. LP RIP BY DR. EBBETTS / REAR CHANNELS SURROUND / REVOLVER SESSIONS
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May 18, 2014 05:37 AM PDT
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"I'm Only Sleeping" is a song by the Beatles from their 1966 studio album Revolver. It was released two months earlier in the United States on the album Yesterday and Today and did not feature on the original US version of Revolver. Credited as a Lennon–McCartney song, it was written primarily by John Lennon.The first draft of Lennon's lyrics for "I'm Only Sleeping", written on the back of a letter from 1966, suggests that he was writing about the joys of staying in bed rather than any drug euphoria sometimes read into the lyrics.While not on tour, due to his lack of routine, Lennon would often spend his time sleeping, reading, writing or watching television, often under the influence of drugs, and would often have to be woken by McCartney for songwriting sessions. In a London Evening Standard article published on 4 March 1966, which contained quotes from an interview in which Lennon made his "more popular than Jesus" remark, Maureen Cleave, a friend of Lennon's, wrote, "He can sleep almost indefinitely, is probably the laziest person in England. 'Physically lazy,' he said. 'I don't mind writing or reading or watching or speaking, but sex is the only physical thing I can be bothered with any more.'" The song was first released on 20 June 1966 as track 2 on the US album Yesterday And Today and on 5 August 1966 as track 3 on Revolver, the album for which the song was originally intended. The US version of Revolver did not feature the song as it had already been released: US Beatles releases frequently differed from the British versions.

THE BEATLES / HERE THERE AND EVERYWHERE / REAR CHANNELS SURROUND SOUND / REVOLVER SESSIONS
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May 18, 2014 05:08 AM PDT
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Recorded for the Beatles' 1966 album Revolver. In his biography Many Years From Now, McCartney said the song is one of his favorites.Beatles' producer George Martin has also mentioned it as one of his favorite McCartney songs. John Lennon reportedly told McCartney it was "The best tune on the album" and said in his 1980 Playboy interview it was "one of my favorite songs of the Beatles."It was ranked the 4th greatest song of all time by Mojo in 2000.

Inspired by the Beach Boys' album Pet Sounds, McCartney wrote the song at Lennon's house in Weybridge while waiting for Lennon to wake up."I sat out by the pool on one of the sun chairs with my guitar and started strumming in E," McCartney recalled. "And soon I had a few chords, and I think by the time he'd woken up, I had pretty much written the song, so we took it indoors and finished it up."

The song is noted for its bitter-sweet melody, layered backing vocals and utilizing a 'clever harmonic scheme'."Here There and Everywhere" was recorded from 14 to 17 June, a few weeks after a Pet Sounds listening party McCartney was affected by.McCartney mentioned in the 1989 radio series McCartney on McCartney that the much-praised vocals were meant to have a "Beach Boys" sound. He has also said he was trying to sing it in the style of Marianne Faithfull.

Paul McCartney – double-tracked vocal, acoustic guitar, bass, finger-snaps
John Lennon – backing vocal, finger-snaps
George Harrison – backing vocal, lead guitar, finger-snaps
Ringo Starr – drums, finger-snaps
George Martin – producer
Geoff Emerick – engineer
Personnel per Ian MacDonald

THE BEATLES / TAXMAN / ALTERNATE MIX / REAR CHANNELS SURROUND SOUND / REVOLVER SESSIONS
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May 17, 2014 09:31 AM PDT
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"Taxman" is a song written by George Harrison released as the opening track on the Beatles' 1966 album Revolver. Its lyrics attack the high levels of progressive tax taken by the British Labor government of Harold Wilson.
Harrison said, "'Taxman' was when I first realized that even though we had started earning money, we were actually giving most of it away in taxes. It was and still is typical."As their earnings placed them in the top tax bracket in the United Kingdom, the Beatles were liable to a 95% super tax introduced by Harold Wilson's Labor government (hence the lyrics "There's one for you, nineteen for me").In a 1984 interview with Playboy magazine, Paul McCartney explained: "George wrote that and I played guitar on it. He wrote it in anger at finding out what the taxman did. He had never known before then what he'll do with your money."

In 1980, Lennon recalled in an interview with Playboy magazine, "I remember the day he called to ask for help on 'Taxman', one of his first songs. I threw in a few one-liners to help the song along, because that's what he asked for. He came to me because he couldn't go to Paul, because Paul wouldn't have helped him at that period. I didn't want to do it... I just sort of bit my tongue and said OK. It had been John and Paul for so long, he'd been left out because he hadn't been a songwriter up until then."Taxman,however, was the sixth song written by Harrison to be included on an album issued by the group.

The backing vocals' references to "Mr Wilson" and "Mr Heath," suggested by Lennon, refer to Harold Wilson and Edward Heath, respectively; the former was the leader of the Labor Party and the latter was the leader of the Conservative Party, the two largest parties in British politics.Wilson, then Prime Minister, had nominated all four of The Beatles as Members of the Order of the British Empire just the previous year.The chanted names replaced two refrains of "Anybody got a bit of money?" heard in take 11, an earlier version released on Anthology 2 in 1996.

Recording began on 20 April, but this was left unused and ten new takes occurred on 21 April, the four tracks being filled that day with drums and bass, Harrison's distorted rhythm guitar, overdubs of his vocal and Lennon and McCartney's backing vocals. The ending was created on 21 June.

As the lead track on Revolver, "Taxman" represents the only time a UK issued Beatles studio album opened with a George Harrison song or lead vocal.

THE BEATLES / ELEANOR RIGBY / ORCHESTRA / REVOLVER SESSIONS
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May 17, 2014 09:07 AM PDT
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Paul McCartney came up with the melody of "Eleanor Rigby" as he experimented with his piano. However, the original name of the protagonist that he chose was not Eleanor Rigby but Miss Daisy Hawkins.The singer-composer Donovan reported that he heard McCartney play it to him before it was finished, with completely different lyrics.In 1966, McCartney recalled how he got the idea for his song: I was sitting at the piano when I thought of it. The first few bars just came to me, and I got this name in my head ... "Miss Daisy Hawkins, picks up the rice in the church". I don't know why. I couldn't think of much more so I put it away for a day. Then the name Father McCartney came to me, and all the lonely people. But I thought that people would think it was supposed to be about my Dad sitting knitting his socks. Dad's a happy lad. So I went through the telephone book and I got the name "McKenzie". McCartney said he came up with the name "Eleanor" from actress Eleanor Bron, who had starred with the Beatles in the film Help!. "Rigby" came from the name of a store in Bristol, "Rigby & Evans Ltd, Wine & Spirit Shippers", which he noticed while seeing his girlfriend of the time, Jane Asher, act in The Happiest Days of Your Life. He recalled in 1984, "I just liked the name. I was looking for a name that sounded natural. 'Eleanor Rigby' sounded natural." However, it has been pointed out that the graveyard of St Peter's Church in Liverpool, where John Lennon and Paul McCartney first met at the Woolton Village garden fete in the afternoon of 6 July 1957, contains the gravestone of an individual called Eleanor Rigby. Paul McCartney has conceded he may have been subconsciously influenced by the name on the gravestone.The real Eleanor Rigby lived a lonely life similar to that of the person in the song. McCartney wrote the first verse by himself, and the Beatles finished the song in the music room of John Lennon's home at Kenwood. John Lennon, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, and their friend Pete Shotton all listened to McCartney play his song through and contributed ideas. Harrison came up with the "Ah, look at all the lonely people" hook. Starr contributed the line "writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear " and suggested making "Father McCartney" darn his socks, which McCartney liked. It was then that Shotton suggested that McCartney change the name of the priest, in case listeners mistook the fictional character in the song for McCartney's own father. The song is often described as a lament for lonely people or a commentary on post-war life in Britain. McCartney could not decide how to end the song, and Shotton finally suggested that the two lonely people come together too late as Father McKenzie conducts Eleanor Rigby's funeral. At the time, Lennon rejected the idea out of hand, but McCartney said nothing and used the idea to finish off the song, later acknowledging Shotton's help.The Rolling Stones' song "Paint It Black" with its oblique reference to a funeral "a line of cars ... all painted black" was in the charts when the recording of "Eleanor Rigby" was being completed. Lennon was quoted in 1971 as having said that he "wrote a good half of the lyrics or more" and in 1980 claimed that he wrote all but the first verse, but Pete Shotton, Lennon's childhood friend, remembered Lennon's contribution as being "absolutely nil".McCartney said that "John helped me on a few words but I'd put it down 80–20 to me, something like that." The song is a prominent example of mode mixture, specifically between the Aeolian mode, also known as natural minor, and the Dorian mode. Set in E minor, the song is based on the chord progression Em-C, typical of the Aeolian mode and utilising notes ♭3, ♭6, and ♭7 in this scale. The lead melody, however, is taken primarily from the somewhat lighter Dorian mode, a minor scale with sharpened sixth degree."Eleanor Rigby" opens with a C-major vocal harmony ("Aah, look at all ..."), before shifting to E-minor (on "lonely people"). The Aeolian C-natural note returns later in the verse on the word "dre-eam" (C-B) as the C chord resolves to the tonic Em, giving an urgency to the melody's mood. The Dorian mode appears with the C# note (6 in the Em scale) at the beginning of the phrase "in the church". The chorus beginning "All the lonely people" involves the viola in a chromatic descent to the 5th; from 7 (D natural on "All the lonely peo-") to 6 (C♯ on "-ple") to ♭6 (C on "they) to 5 (B on "from"). This is said to "add an air of inevitability to the flow of the music (and perhaps to the plight of the characters in the song)"

THE BEATLES / I'M ONLY SLEEPING / INSTRUMENTAL / REVOLVER SESSIONS
Clean
May 17, 2014 08:59 AM PDT
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"I'm Only Sleeping" is a song by the Beatles from their 1966 studio album Revolver. It was released two months earlier in the United States on the album Yesterday and Today and did not feature on the original US version of Revolver. Credited as a Lennon–McCartney song, it was written primarily by John Lennon.The first draft of Lennon's lyrics for "I'm Only Sleeping", written on the back of a letter from 1966, suggests that he was writing about the joys of staying in bed rather than any drug euphoria sometimes read into the lyrics.While not on tour, due to his lack of routine, Lennon would often spend his time sleeping, reading, writing or watching television, often under the influence of drugs, and would often have to be woken by McCartney for songwriting sessions. In a London Evening Standard article published on 4 March 1966, which contained quotes from an interview in which Lennon made his "more popular than Jesus" remark, Maureen Cleave, a friend of Lennon's, wrote, "He can sleep almost indefinitely, is probably the laziest person in England. 'Physically lazy,' he said. 'I don't mind writing or reading or watching or speaking, but sex is the only physical thing I can be bothered with any more.'" The song was first released on 20 June 1966 as track 2 on the US album Yesterday And Today and on 5 August 1966 as track 3 on Revolver, the album for which the song was originally intended. The US version of Revolver did not feature the song as it had already been released: US Beatles releases frequently differed from the British versions.

THE BEATLES / I'M ONLY SLEEPING / TAKE 1 DEMO / REVOLVER SESSIONS
Clean
May 17, 2014 08:32 AM PDT
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"I'm Only Sleeping" is a song by the Beatles from their 1966 studio album Revolver. It was released two months earlier in the United States on the album Yesterday and Today and did not feature on the original US version of Revolver. Credited as a Lennon–McCartney song, it was written primarily by John Lennon.The first draft of Lennon's lyrics for "I'm Only Sleeping", written on the back of a letter from 1966, suggests that he was writing about the joys of staying in bed rather than any drug euphoria sometimes read into the lyrics.While not on tour, due to his lack of routine, Lennon would often spend his time sleeping, reading, writing or watching television, often under the influence of drugs, and would often have to be woken by McCartney for songwriting sessions. In a London Evening Standard article published on 4 March 1966, which contained quotes from an interview in which Lennon made his "more popular than Jesus" remark, Maureen Cleave, a friend of Lennon's, wrote, "He can sleep almost indefinitely, is probably the laziest person in England. 'Physically lazy,' he said. 'I don't mind writing or reading or watching or speaking, but sex is the only physical thing I can be bothered with any more.'"

The song was first released on 20 June 1966 as track 2 on the US album Yesterday And Today and on 5 August 1966 as track 3 on Revolver, the album for which the song was originally intended. The US version of Revolver did not feature the song as it had already been released: US Beatles releases frequently differed from the British versions.

THE BEATLES / LOVE YOU TO / REAR SURROUND CHANNELS / REVOLVER SESSIONS
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May 17, 2014 08:03 AM PDT
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"Love You To" is a song by the Beatles from the album Revolver. It is sung and written by George Harrison and features Indian classical instrumentation: tabla,a pair of hand-drums, sitar and a tambura providing a drone. "Love You To" was the first Beatles song that seriously attempted to incorporate Indian classical music and has even been hailed as the first pop song to emulate a non-western form in structure and instrumentation.As such, it first introduced Western pop music fans to the eastern, Indian music that Harrison would promote for the rest of his career.

As Harrison seldom had titles for his songs, the working title for "Love You To" was "Granny Smith".Lewisohn states that the first basic tracks of the song were taped in Abbey Road's studio two on Monday, 11 April 1966 in sessions between 2.30pm-7pm and 8pm-12.45am.They initially involved Harrison singing to his own acoustic guitar accompaniment, with Paul McCartney supplying backing vocals. The sitar came in at take three and again as an overdub onto take six, along with a tabla, bass and fuzz guitar.Lewisohn specifically states: "George played the sitar but an outside musician, Anil Bhagwat, was recruited to play the tabla."

Harrison had been practicing the sitar since he used it to record "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)" in October 1965 (he was soon to do so from its leading exponent Ravi Shankar) and Lavezzoli writes that "His playing throughout the song is an astonishing improvement over 'Norwegian Wood'. In fact, 'Love You To' remains the most accomplished performance on sitar by any rock musician."Bhagwat was chosen to play tabla after Harrison had contacted Patricia Angadi, co-founder of London's Asian Music Circle.Bhagwat later recalled of his involvement: "It was only when a Rolls Royce came to pick me up that I realized I'd be playing on a Beatles session. When I arrived at Abbey Road there were girls everywhere with Thermos flasks, cakes, sandwiches, waiting for the Beatles to come out. George told me what he wanted and I tuned the tabla with him. He suggested I play something in the Ravi Shankar style, 16-beats, though he agreed that I should improvise. Indian music is all improvisation."

Ringo Starr is the only other Beatle who plays on the song, contributing tambourine. McCartney originally recorded backing vocals for the song but these were left out of the final mix.There have been various suggestions of un credited personnel from the Asian Music Circle who contributed.
MacDonald makes an un referenced claim that there was an "un credited sitarist" on this track.

A brief portion of the song was included in the Beatles' animated film Yellow Submarine when Harrison's character is introduced.

The song is in the key of C Dorian and emulates North Indian Khyal music.Harrison begins by twice stroking his sitar's resonating strings (a common technique before the opening alap segment of a raga).In the alap section (lasting 35 seconds) the melody is previewed, before the tabla, tamboura and percussion commence a Madhya laya (medium tempo) Bandish or gat.This opening "filled with croaking drones, pregnant pauses and softly elasticized notes" has been termed both an evocation of the Mysterious East and a total surprise on such a record, indeed "one of the most brazenly exotic acts of stylistic experimentation ever heard on a popular LP."Some critics consider that the lack of a clearly measured tempo in this overture "sets musical and, in this particular context, spiritual time adrift- until the tune kicks into gear and the singer observes that "Each day just goes so fast."The song otherwise conforms to a basic I-flatVII sparse chord structure with 8-bar verse A sections and 12-bar B sections in an ABAB pattern.[13] The song follows the pitches of Kafi That, the Indian equivalent of the Dorian mode.The "meditative harmonic coloring" provided by the tamboura drone complements the cynical worldview expressed in the lyric: "There's people standing round who screw you in the ground. They'll fill you in with all their sins you'll see," which is answered differently by the sitar in each verse.The drut (fast tempo) gat does not begin until the very end of the song, pointedly as the vocals fade upon "I'll make love to you, if you want me to."
George Harrison – multi-tracked lead vocals, acoustic guitar, fuzz electric guitar, bass,Sitar
Paul McCartney – backing vocal
Ringo Starr – tambourine
Anil Bhagwat – tabla
Other Indian musicians – sitar, tambura
Personnel per Ian McDonald, except as noted.
Personnel notes
A.Ian McDonald is uncertain George Harrison plays the sitar on this track. However, Walter Everett and Mark Lewisohn assume that Harrison plays the sitar.
B.Paul McCartney sang backing vocals in some takes, at a very low volume.

THE BEATLES / ELEANOR RIGBY / FRONT CHANNELS SURROUND SOUND MIX / REVOLVER SESSIONS
Clean
May 17, 2014 04:31 AM PDT
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Paul McCartney came up with the melody of "Eleanor Rigby" as he experimented with his piano. However, the original name of the protagonist that he chose was not Eleanor Rigby but Miss Daisy Hawkins.The singer-composer Donovan reported that he heard McCartney play it to him before it was finished, with completely different lyrics.In 1966, McCartney recalled how he got the idea for his song:

I was sitting at the piano when I thought of it. The first few bars just came to me, and I got this name in my head ... "Miss Daisy Hawkins, picks up the rice in the church". I don't know why. I couldn't think of much more so I put it away for a day. Then the name Father McCartney came to me, and all the lonely people. But I thought that people would think it was supposed to be about my Dad sitting knitting his socks. Dad's a happy lad. So I went through the telephone book and I got the name "McKenzie".

McCartney said he came up with the name "Eleanor" from actress Eleanor Bron, who had starred with the Beatles in the film Help!. "Rigby" came from the name of a store in Bristol, "Rigby & Evans Ltd, Wine & Spirit Shippers", which he noticed while seeing his girlfriend of the time, Jane Asher, act in The Happiest Days of Your Life. He recalled in 1984, "I just liked the name. I was looking for a name that sounded natural. 'Eleanor Rigby' sounded natural." However, it has been pointed out that the graveyard of St Peter's Church in Liverpool, where John Lennon and Paul McCartney first met at the Woolton Village garden fete in the afternoon of 6 July 1957, contains the gravestone of an individual called Eleanor Rigby. Paul McCartney has conceded he may have been subconsciously influenced by the name on the gravestone.The real Eleanor Rigby lived a lonely life similar to that of the person in the song.

McCartney wrote the first verse by himself, and the Beatles finished the song in the music room of John Lennon's home at Kenwood. John Lennon, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, and their friend Pete Shotton all listened to McCartney play his song through and contributed ideas. Harrison came up with the "Ah, look at all the lonely people" hook. Starr contributed the line "writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear " and suggested making "Father McCartney" darn his socks, which McCartney liked. It was then that Shotton suggested that McCartney change the name of the priest, in case listeners mistook the fictional character in the song for McCartney's own father.

The song is often described as a lament for lonely people or a commentary on post-war life in Britain.

McCartney could not decide how to end the song, and Shotton finally suggested that the two lonely people come together too late as Father McKenzie conducts Eleanor Rigby's funeral. At the time, Lennon rejected the idea out of hand, but McCartney said nothing and used the idea to finish off the song, later acknowledging Shotton's help.The Rolling Stones' song "Paint It Black" with its oblique reference to a funeral "a line of cars ... all painted black" was in the charts when the recording of "Eleanor Rigby" was being completed.

Lennon was quoted in 1971 as having said that he "wrote a good half of the lyrics or more" and in 1980 claimed that he wrote all but the first verse, but Pete Shotton, Lennon's childhood friend, remembered Lennon's contribution as being "absolutely nil".McCartney said that "John helped me on a few words but I'd put it down 80–20 to me, something like that."

The song is a prominent example of mode mixture, specifically between the Aeolian mode, also known as natural minor, and the Dorian mode. Set in E minor, the song is based on the chord progression Em-C, typical of the Aeolian mode and utilising notes ♭3, ♭6, and ♭7 in this scale. The lead melody, however, is taken primarily from the somewhat lighter Dorian mode, a minor scale with sharpened sixth degree."Eleanor Rigby" opens with a C-major vocal harmony ("Aah, look at all ..."), before shifting to E-minor (on "lonely people"). The Aeolian C-natural note returns later in the verse on the word "dre-eam" (C-B) as the C chord resolves to the tonic Em, giving an urgency to the melody's mood.

The Dorian mode appears with the C# note (6 in the Em scale) at the beginning of the phrase "in the church". The chorus beginning "All the lonely people" involves the viola in a chromatic descent to the 5th; from 7 (D natural on "All the lonely peo-") to 6 (C♯ on "-ple") to ♭6 (C on "they) to 5 (B on "from"). This is said to "add an air of inevitability to the flow of the music (and perhaps to the plight of the characters in the song)"

THE BEATLES / I'LL BE ON MY WAY ( WITH INTRO BY MODERATOR + GEORGE HARRISON ) BBC SESSIONS
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May 17, 2014 04:16 AM PDT
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"I'll Be on My Way" is a Lennon–McCartney song, which was first released on 26 April 1963 by Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas as the b-side of their single "Do You Want to Know a Secret", a song also written by Lennon–McCartney. The single reached number two in the UK charts while "From Me to You" by the Beatles was occupying the number 1 position. According to John Lennon, the song was written by Paul McCartney: "This was early Paul."

In 1980 Lennon said "that's Paul on the voids of driving through the country."

"I'll Be on My Way" is considered to be the first song that Lennon and McCartney "gave away",and the Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas' version of the song is included on the EMI album The Songs Lennon and McCartney Gave away.

In 1963, the Beatles and Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas were both acts managed by Brian Epstein, with George Martin as their producer.

The song may have been influenced by the musical and lyrical style of Buddy Holly. The persona forces a happy-go-lucky view on his break-up to make himself feel better, similar in character to Holly's 1959 song "It Doesn't Matter Anymore"
This song was recorded by the Beatles on 4 April 1963 at the BBC Paris Theatre, London, and broadcast on the BBC radio show Side by Side on 24 June 1963. This is the only known recording of "I'll Be on My Way" by the Beatles; it features joint lead vocals by McCartney and Lennon, and can be heard on the Beatles' album Live at the BBC, where it is the only previously unreleased original song.

THE RONETTS / WALKING IN THE RAIN / TAKE 7 / WALL OF SOUND (RARE MASTERS)
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December 22, 2013 09:47 AM PST
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I want him and I need him
And someday, someway
I'll meet him

He'll be kind of shy
But real good lookin' too
And I'll be certain he's my guy
By the things he'll like to do

Like walking in the rain
And wishing on the stars up above
And being so in love

When he's near me, I'll kiss him
And when he leaves me
I'll miss him

Though sometimes we'll fight
But I won't really care
And I'll know it's gonna be alright
'Cause we've got so much we share

Like walking in the rain
And wishing on the stars up above
And being so in love

Johnny
No, no he'll never do
Bobby
No it isn't him too
They would never
No they'd never, never, ever love

Walking in the rain
And wishing on the stars up above
And being so in love

Oh oh, where can he be? Oh oh
I've been wishing and hoping
Where can he be?

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